The Glover Review of Designated Landscapes

AONbs and national parks are under review

Cornwall AONB Partnership Manager, Colette Beckham explains…

The government’s 25 Year Environment Plan was published by DEFRA in January 2018. Chapter two of the plan outlines how government intends to ‘restore nature and enhance the beauty of landscapes’, with a key action to undertake a review of designated landscapes, namely National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Julian Glover speaking at the 2018 Conference of the National Association of AONBs

Julian Glover speaking at the 2018 Conference of the National Association of AONBs

The Review came forward relatively swiftly in the summer of 2018, headed up by Julian Glover, Associate Editor of the Evening Standard, supported by a panel of experts. Cornwall was delighted to be the first port of call for Julian as he embarked on a series of visits to AONBs and National Parks to scope the issues.

In October, Environment Secretary Michael Gove MP and Julian Glover invited the public to respond to a Call for Evidence. This survey, now closed, asked a broad range of questions, trying to understand if our protected landscapes are fit for 21st century environmental challenges, particularly the recovery of nature. The review considered our designations in terms of meeting the needs of communities and whether housing and transport in protected landscapes could be improved? The review also looked at resourcing of our nationally treasured landscapes and asked if more landscapes need to be designated?

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During autumn 2018, the Cornwall AONB Partnership undertook a series of sessions and workshops in order to compile its evidence and with good discussion and co-operation, the Partnership arrived at a form of words that received broad consensus. Incorporated within the evidence was the results of an 8-week public consultation by the AONB Unit to seek the public’s views of the performance of Cornwall’s protected landscape.

So what did we say?

The full evidence from the Cornwall AONB Partnership can be downloaded here

The Cornwall AONB Partnership examined a number of options for future models of governance for the Partnership and resourcing issues. We looked at current issues affecting the conservation and enhancement of the AONB and we examined opportunities going forward.

The main point put forward are this.

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1) Management of the protected landscape needs to reflect the current policy of having ‘the highest status of protection’ in planning. There needs to be much improved outcomes for the protected landscape from the planning system.

2) There is a huge opportunity in the development of the new agri-environment scheme to be developed beyond Brexit. The AONB Management Plans are a great opportunity to work with farmers to set deliverable objectives for public goods outcomes such as the restoration of nature, which should be a key priority of the scheme. The government should do all it can to maintain the profitability of our family farms in Cornwall, so critical to maintaining the landscape.

Coastal habitats could play a vital role in a Nature Recovery network. Photo: John Borlase

Coastal habitats could play a vital role in a Nature Recovery network. Photo: John Borlase

3) Protected landscapes contain some of the UK’s most biodiverse landscapes in the country, yet we’re not faring much better than non-designated areas in terms of the condition of these habitats. Protected landscapes can be used as a focus for the nature recovery areas outlined in the 25-Year Plan and could lead the way in the restoration of nature and ecosystems.

The South West Coast Path is under pressure from coastal change and erosion. Photo: Dave Mathews

The South West Coast Path is under pressure from coastal change and erosion. Photo: Dave Mathews

4) Cornwall has specific pressures on it generated by the huge influx of visitors we experience each year. This puts transport infrastructure, our access networks and habitats under great pressure. We need the resources to manage the adverse impacts of tourism and the resources to positively manage the AONB as a destination, particularly around the coast.

5) Because of the unique pressures on the coast and the unique disparate geography of the AONB, the Cornwall AONB Partnership has called for Bodmin Moor to become a stand alone designation. Larger in it own right that many other AONBs, the moor has very specific management requirements that should be addressed separately to the Cornwall Coast as another designation. This would mean dedicated resources for the coast and the moor and a separate Management Plan for each.

6) In considering modes of governance, The Cornwall AONB Partnership has not asked for a National Park for Cornwall, rather we’d like a consultation on a new model, which is not an AONB, but reflects more accurately the purposes and highest status of protection of the current AONB. The new model should have a legal basis for governance and become a statutory consultee for AONB planning.

We’ve also highlighted three particular areas where we would like to see an extension of the AONB boundary and asked for the process for this to be made much shorter and less resource intensive.

7) Finally, we have highlighted to the Glover Review the relatively small resource flowing into Cornwall for protected landscape management. We have called for a level of resourcing that represents fairness for Cornwall in comparison with other rural areas. We think the level of resources needs to take account of some of the particular challenges faced by Cornwall’s protected landscape, outlined above. We also think that the level of resources needs to more realistically reflect the ambition and breadth of responsibility going forward.

So what next for the Review? At the moment, Julian Glover and his panel are sifting through the huge mountain of submissions submitted in response to the Call for Evidence. This spring, the intention is to invite some further verbal evidence and then to begin to form opinions and recommendations to government. It is currently expected that the review will publish its report in the autumn of 2019, so watch this space.


























Wheal Buzzy Bee Healthy Walks begin January 23rd and other chances to become involved in the project

The AONB’s lottery funded Wheal Buzzy Project is up and running!

Wheal Buzzy is a unique project where over the course of the next two years we will be working with Landowners, Community Groups, Schools and Individuals to enhance and create habitats for Cornwall’s nationally important Solitary Bee population. Of the UK’s 250 species of Solitary Bee, Cornwall is home to roughly 190 individual species of Solitary Bees (Miner Bees).

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Beyond initially working across 16 individual sites (22 Hectares) we will be running regular walks “Bee Healthy Walks”

Bee Healthy Walks, are a series of “Health walks” in some of the most iconic areas of Cornwall AONB all of which have a strong link to our important colonies of miner bees.

A health walk is a led walk, which normally lasts between 30 minutes to an hour. Walking as a group provides not only the physical benefits of walking but also social contact and its associated support

Under the mantle of ‘Bee Healthy Walks’ We launch in St Agnes on January 23rd with our first walk beginning from the Reepers Coombe car park at 10am this will be a leisurely circular walk of approximately 1 mile with some steep climbs (with points to stop and rest) followed by an opportunity for tea and cake at the end of the walk.

Walks will be graded according to guidance taken from the rambler’s association website; full details of upcoming walks for the next few weeks will be available on the AONB website soon. In the meantime if you would like any further information or to register an interest please contact charlotte.goodship@cornwall.gov.uk or 01872 322307..

Walks in St Agnes will take place weekly from 23rd of January, following on from St Agnes we will be rolling them out in St Ives and St Just later in the spring.

Wheal Buzzy is a project which has the community and individuals at its very heart, as such there will be a number of opportunities for you to become involved the first of which is a Buzzy Volunteer Day at St Ives Community Orchard on February 16th https://www.facebook.com/events/268194173851375/

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A Monumental Improvement makes a great start!

The Cornwall AONB is home to an often forgotten, but equally outstanding heritage that collectively covers over 3,000 years of Cornish history from the Bronze Age to the Second World War. The Cornwall AONB Partnership has been developing a new project to safeguard and enhance the most vulnerable 140 scheduled sites across the AONB area since April and this has made a successful start.

Nine Stones Circle on Bodmin Moor

Nine Stones Circle on Bodmin Moor

Thanks to a grant of £9,700 from Historic England awarded in March 2018 and supported by the professional skills of the Cornwall Archaeological Unit we have been able to survey and assess 118 of the 140 sites with the active support of local conservation groups and Truro College.

This work achieved the training of 65 local residents in surveying skills at four training events across the Duchy including Truro College, Liskeard, Helston and Maker between April and June.  We were overwhelmed and extremely thankful that thirty of these local residents kindly helped us to survey and record many of the 118 sites, applying their new skills and developing new interests and aspirations to volunteer to help support and safeguard Cornwall’s proud built heritage.

Rame Conservation Trust volunteers learn how to record scheduled forts in our beautiful Rame Head section under the professional gaze of Cornwall Archaeological Unit’s James Gossip

Rame Conservation Trust volunteers learn how to record scheduled forts in our beautiful Rame Head section under the professional gaze of Cornwall Archaeological Unit’s James Gossip

The training was very well received with the Cornwall Archaelogical Society’s Rosy Hanns saying: -

Thanks for a smashing day! I really enjoyed learning more about Rame.


Rame Conservation Trust’s Lyn Reid also said: -

Thank you for organising the scheduled monuments event - it was a thoroughly enjoyable day. We appreciate all your expertise and advice.

Volunteers went on to help prioritise 40 of the 118 sites for the development of a bid to the Heritage Lottery Fund and other funders in 2019. These sites are the most accessible ones and have the most scope to meet the requirements of funders. In addition a number of the volunteer groups gained new members with different skills and experience.

As Iain from the Cornwall Archaeological Society says: -

I really think this project will re-invigourate the Area Reps (Cornwall Archaeological Society’s Monument Watch volunteers).

The stunning triple coastal forts at Trethias on the north coast

The stunning triple coastal forts at Trethias on the north coast

We look forward to continuing to work with local people and our partners to secure further funding for the project in 2019.